Recognizing senile dementia versus senility

Senile Dementia

Understanding the difference between senile dementia and senility might seem irrelevant. After all, don’t they both essentially mean the same thing? To help clarify how dementia and senility differ, let’s first begin with a brief definition of dementia, which is the name for a group of symptoms caused by disorders that affect the brain.

Dementia is different than normal senility or normal aging. While it is common for people to confuse senility with senile dementia, senility in elderly includes the gradual deterioration of the brain resulting in memory loss and mental abilities simply due to old age. For example, an occasional memory slip, like forgetting where you left your wallet or keys can be considered normal forgetfulness. Although memory loss is one of the common symptoms of dementia, memory loss alone does not automatically suggest dementia. Some memory loss is part of normal senility and normal aging, but when someone begins showing multiple symptoms of dementia, it may be time to contact a primary care physician and request some testing. First and foremost, the symptoms of senile dementia involve severe mental decline that can disrupt daily life.

Some symptoms to watch for in senile dementia include:

  • Getting lost in familiar places
  • Repetitive questioning
  • Odd or inappropriate behaviors
  • Frequent memory problems
  • Changes in level of alertness
  • Personality Changes

Unfortunately, there is not yet a cure for dementia, but once senile dementia has been recognized and diagnosed, doctors are able to keep the progression under control. Early detection of dementia can also help your loved one receive the treatment and care they need.

Dealing with senility and dementia is frustrating for the individual and their loved ones. If you are starting to notice a family member is exhibiting signs of dementia, you may need to consider professional assisted care. At Paradise Living Centers our Care Manager is a certified dementia practitioner and she works closely with our caregivers and full-time nurse to provide 24/7 awake care. We also have memory care experts that come to our homes weekly to conduct activities and memory exercises with our residents. It’s our mission to ensure residents are given the quality care they deserve, and their families are given the peace of mind they desire.

To learn more about our assisted services or to tour one of our beautiful homes, contact Kristie Chadwick at (480) 878 – 4112.